Kewlness. Have rack, don't wanna see the lot. Who you gonna call? Volkmar Druebbisch.


Bada who? So the man's blessed with a Germanically tongue-twisting name. That's why he picked something terribly short and to the point for his company. pARTicular. Besides the obvious, it hides "part" to slyly hint at "modularity". Those inclined to see more in a piece of art than even its maker will find a version of "articulate" hidden therein as well.


In business for 10 years, Druebbisch has joined what goes for the establishment in our small cottage industry of the High End. But he hasn't sold out nor caved in to me-too volume production. In fact, his latest addition to the line of racks and stands is terribly original and terribly clever (the key phrase "terrible" is applied here in quantities to, tongue-in-cheek, point at Volkmar's very Germanic exactitude whereby everything in business is pursued the old way - taking pride, committed to excel... you know, all that stuffy outmoded stuff.)


Called simply the case, its dimensions are H = 33", D = 20.5", W = 28". The European Walnut veneer offers continuous grain and the doors on Euro hinges are book-matched, naturally. So much so nice but apparently ordinary. Except for four very particular holes.

Get it? Take any of Vokmar's semi or fully suspended stainless steel racks and slip the case right over its shelved carcass. Badaboom. The equipment's hidden now, the open back allows easy access and the continuous modularity of the H-bracket shelving system sliding and locking up and down the four upright posts retains all the original functionality of the Ypsilon, Summit or various other pARTicular racks.


Brilliant. Simple. Original. pARTicular. So very Volkmar. And never once during his call did he pitch me on the airborne vibration isolation angle.


After all, doesn't it stand to reason that if your loudspeakers are the biggest generators of high amplitude bad vibes in your room (both acoustically through the air and as mechanical jack hammers through the floor), that encasing the electronics behind solid walls should protect them against airborne assaults?


Some clever marketeer elsewhere would surely have turned this into a loud feature. Volkmar didn't. He merely pitched the hand-in-glove compatibility with all of his prior stands so that their owners can readily upgrade to full case work without sacrificing any of their prior investmnet. And the generous width of the case allows side-by-side placement of, say a preamp and external phono stage while the top can become the base for a reasonably sized televsion screen or turntable. 'nuff said. This is cool shit. pARTicular's on the case...